Friday, 18 August 2017

Steel for August: Sweden's Steel Stash



August has spinel and peridot as its birth stones and although we'll end the month with a look at some regal examples of those stones, there aren't enough to fill a whole four weeks of sparkly wonder. So this summer, we're taking a look at some of the tiaras that just don't fit anywhere else in the calendar of jewels including some of those made mainly of metal. Yes, metal. We've had a look at some of the golden additions to the modern European sparkle stash and now it's time to get really, well, metally, and start on the steel. Sweden has two tiaras made of the stuff and they're both rather pretty. Here's a sparkle fest you weren't expecting, Steel for August.

Thursday, 17 August 2017

Gold for August: Queen Sonja's modern tiara


Queen Sonja of Norway in her golden tiara during a State Visit to Poland in 2012
(photo kongehuset.no)

August is a chance to look at some of the gems that don't fit the calendar of jewels and golden pieces are right at the top of this sparkling list. Given that it's been associated with royalty for centuries. gold plays little part in the tiara collection of many royal houses but the ruling houses in Scandinavia are changing all that right now. Queen Sonja was a bit of a trailblazer in that regard - meet her golden tiara, you won't forget it in a hurry.

Wednesday, 16 August 2017

Gold for August: Queen Margrethe's gilded flowers


No one else is ever going to be wearing the same headpiece when Margrethe chooses her poppies

They sound as if they should be one of the prettiest modern additions to a royal jewellery box but this set of gem encrusted flowers is controversial and then some. The Golden Poppies belonging to Queen Margrethe of Denmark are a modern take on the traditional head wear of royal ladies but these are a real love them or hate them set of jewels. Here is the most talked about of all the sets made of gold for August.

Tuesday, 15 August 2017

Gold for August: Queen Margrethe's sparkling tiara



Golden flowers for a queen - the unusual tiara belonging to Margrethe of Denmark

The birthstones of August, peridot and spinel, are rarely used in royal jewellery but that doesn't mean the calendar of regal gems can just take a month off. The long, hot days of summer are perfect for mopping up some of the sparklers that don't fit anywhere else and where better to start than with a metal that is closely associated with royalty but rarely dominates tiaras - gold. And if you want to find a gold tiara where else would you look than in the Danish royal jewellery box. Queen Margrethe never lets us down.

Monday, 14 August 2017

Royalty of 1917: the heirs


This special series is looking back at the royalty of a century past. One hundred years ago, the regal map of Europe was very different with far more monarchies and ruling houses than we have now. We're beginning our time travel with a glance with a who's who of the dynasties we know today, retrospectives on how the monarchies of 2017 were a whole century ago. We've already seen the rulers and their consorts, now it's time to look at the heirs. They're listed below according to how long they had been heir to their country's throne at the time. Kings to be with sad stories and a powerhouse of a queen regnant in the making follow...here are the heirs of 1917.

Saturday, 12 August 2017

One royal week, five royal photos



It's been a quiet week on the royal front if you're not Prince Henrik of Denmark. In which case it's been an expose yourself to global ridicule kind of seven days. But let's ignore him, it's the best thing to do with hissy fitters. Instead, let's enjoy some of the best photos of a quiet-ish royal week. Despite the summer lull we had enough regal sightings to keep us busy for another few days. Here are some of the pictorial highlights.

Thursday, 10 August 2017

Royalty of 1917: the consorts


It is another time, all of its own. The royal scene of 1917 is so different from now it may as well be another world. Europe was dominated by monarchies whereas now they are in the minority. Over August, I'm going to look back on the blog at the royalty of 1917 and it's starting with the shape of the dynasties that still exist today. Yesterday was all about the sovereigns who ruled the royal houses that remain in 2017. This part looks at their consorts. We've got a smattering of princesses turned queens and a very determined duke here. Settle back and enjoy the consorts of 1917....

Wednesday, 9 August 2017

Royalty of 1917: the monarchs


A century ago, the royal world looked very different. There were a lot more of them to start off with. In a world riven by war, the ancient dynasties that had held power were holding on but sometimes only just. This month, I'm taking a look back at the royal world of a summer a century ago and it all starts with the people in charge of the dynasties we still know today. There will be another post soon looking at the rulers of monarchies that have long gone. But first here are the sovereigns of 1917, in order of reign length starting with the one who had been ruling the longest by 1917....

Tuesday, 8 August 2017

Prince Henrik's blame game


If ever there was a moment to keep quiet and carry on it was just after you'd made yourself a global laughing stock. Prince Henrik is having none of that. Days after getting everyone tutting and tittering by throwing the ultimate royal hissy fit and saying he wouldn't be buried next to his wife because he'd never been given the title of king consort, he's made things even worse. In an interview to be published in full tomorrow, Henrik is laying the blame at the feet of the Queen of Denmark.

Denmark's royals on damage limitation duty


Keep calm and carry on. That motto has got many a monarchy out of a muddle and it's being put into good use in Denmark right now. As Prince Henrik keeps the world entertained as he rows with himself about where he's going to be buried, the next generation of royals is keeping it real. What better way to show the regal focus is on the country and not the contents of a still to be dug grave than getting out and about and being seen to do just that? Cue the Crown Prince and Princess of Denmark on a charm offensive.